Nice [1].

Well, I had hard times with the title of the post because of its ambiguity.  However, you can definitely say that Nice is nice.

Nice is a middle-size city with its own airport by the coast (you can literally see planes very close when casually walking by the sea). But even though it’s not as big as Paris or Oslo, I find it hard to describe it in only one post.

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We landed in Nice around 10 am on Sunday the 1st. And here’s the thing – it’s better not to come on Sundays simply because 90% of shops are closed. Of course, those small souvenir-boutiques and restaurants are open, but if you were thinking about bigger shopping, you will have to wait until next morning.

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Nice is a city full of runners. Even though it was approximately 30-32 degrees, there were still people willing to sweat extra in this weather. Huge respect, I mean.

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For lunch on the first day, we went to Terra Madre, which is located just by the coast. You could expect expensive food, but their pasta and beer were fairly cheap considering our other later experiences with eating out. The waitress was also very helpful and told us where’s the closest open grocery store (because of our Sunday-struggle).

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on this street, you can find the best and the cheapest ice cream

When we went next day for breakfast, (also by the coast), to Le Queenie, we weren’t prepared for the expense. Because we were very hungry we didn’t want to walk around for too long, so we just had to order. But c’mon… a single, fancy-pancy toast for 10€, while English breakfast also was 10€ and you don’t get coffee included. Besides good taste and location, I don’t recommend this place for people who value their money.

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It’s way better and more affordable to go to the supermarket, grab one crispy baguette, a package of delicious Jamón serrano and make breakfast yourself at your stay.

And another tip (before I will finish with this post): whenever you’re eating out, remember to order caraf d’eau. Why? Because in France you don’t pay for still water and you can get it for free if you say those magical words. But be careful, in some places the waiter can trick you to buy bottled water. You have to be very unequivocal about that. We ended up twice or three times with an expensive bottle of Evian water, even though we just wanted regular, still water. I guess you have to say caraf d’eau

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Anyway, that’s it for today. I’m quite late with writing and editing photos, that’s why I have to divine post into two parts. Hope you enjoyed it anyway. See you on Sunday!

Author: againorway

student, Norway-lover, artist, dreamer, book worm

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